August 2016

August 2016

Aging Answers August 2016

Does Your Senior Pet Need to Go Back to School?

If your pet seems to be forgetting something they used to know, should you think “Back to School” for them? The short answer is: probably not.

Believe it or not, cats and dogs, like people, also can suffer “cognitive dysfunction” (i.e. memory loss like Alzheimer’s disease) as early as 11 years of age. Sometimes age-related changes may look like memory loss, but aren’t.

About Senior Cats

According to the American Association of Feline Practitioners, a cat is considered a senior at the age of 11 (60 in human years) and geriatric at the age of 15 (76 in human years).

If your cat is no longer using the litterbox, it may not be a problem with their brain. It’s possible your cat is getting arthritis, diabetes or has kidney disease. That’s why talking to your veterinarian about any problem your cat has with using the litterbox is worth a visit.

The other thing to note about cats is that they are extremely good at hiding their illnesses. No matter how well you think you know your cat, they may be sick without you knowing it. Regular veterinary visits with your cat can help with detecting problems and treating them before they become so bad that your cat suffers.

About Senior Dogs

It’s a little trickier to estimate when dogs are considered a senior or geriatric. That’s because dog breeds vary in size. As a general rule of thumb, the bigger the dog, the shorter their lifespan. For instance, very large breed dogs like Great Danes may be seniors as early as 5 years of age, while small breed dogs like toy poodles may not be considered seniors until the age of 10. Ask your veterinarian if your dog may be considered a senior or not.

If your dog is peeing indoors and this is not typical, it may be a sign your dog has joint problems (e.g.

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August 2016 Education/Schools

Editor’s Pick: Interactive Learning in Akron

Families can hold and touch real fossils at this science center in Akron. There are 17 exciting exhibits, interactive learning opportunities like fossil replica making and live animal encounters, and a 2-acre park with a 200-foot zip-line. ...
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August 2016 Magazine

August 2016

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August 2016 Uncategorized

Get Ready for Back to School with a Homework Nook

Homework may not be your child’s favorite part of the school year, but it’s no secret that completing those after-school assignments can lead to academic success. To help the students in your household develop good study habits and tackle their homework with confidence, set up at least one well-stocked study station within your home. ...
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August 2016 Education/Schools

Helping Kids Transition to Middle School

The start of the school year is a time filled with excitement and a little bit of nervousness, especially if your child is starting at a new school. Middle school can be a big change for many students and families. Real students reveal how the transition really works. ...
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August 2016 Uncategorized

#CLEMAMA — Teen’s Perspective on Working a Part-Time Job

It's a teen takeover as Makayla writes the CLE Mama column for mom Sara Carnes — morning show co-host at 95.5 The Fish and Northeast Ohio Parent columnist. She provides valuable information to parents — from her perspective — about the benefits of teens having part-time jobs, along with great tips on how to support their decision and search. ...
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August 2016 Uncategorized

Reduce Lead Risk in Your Home

Lead, a toxic metal found in the earth, is poisonous to humans and particularly harmful to children ages 6 and younger. Reducing your family’s risk for lead exposure and its harmful effects includes adding key items to your diet, examining and cleaning your environment, and proper testing and treatment. ...
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August 2016 Health

Sobering Facts About Teen Alcohol Abuse

Teens experiment with alcohol for a number of reasons. Some may drink to appear older or because of peer pressure. Others may begin using it because of low self-esteem, depression, anxiety or as a coping mechanism if they are facing challenging situations in their homes or at school. Teens — and their still developing brains — can be especially vulnerable to the dangers of alcohol abuse. ...
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